Keynote: ‘Collaborative collections through a participatory commons’, 2014 National Digital Forum conference

I was delighted to be invited to present at New Zealand’s 2014 National Digital Forum conference in Wellington. I was asked to speak on my work on the ‘participatory commons’. As a focus for explaining the need for a participatory commons, I asked, ‘What could we create if museums, libraries and archives pooled their collections and invited specialists and enthusiasts to help link and enhance their records?’.

As a conceptual framework rather than a literal technical architecture, every bit of clearly licensed content with (ideally) structured data published around it makes a contribution to ‘the commons’. In my keynote I explored some reasons why building tightly-focused projects on top of that content can help motivate participation in crowdsourcing and citizen history, and some reasons why it’s still hard (hint: it needs great content supported by relevant structured data), using my TCD/CENDARI research project on ‘lived experiences of World War One‘ as an example.

The video is now online.

Seminar: ‘Citizen History and its discontents’, Institute of Historical Research Digital History seminar

I was invited to give a talk on my work in the Institute of Historical Research (IHR) Seminar in Digital History series.  I talked about ‘Citizen History and its discontents’:

‘An increasing number of crowdsourcing projects are making claims about ‘citizen history’ – but are they really helping people become historians, or are they overstating their contribution? Can citizen history projects succeed without communities of experts and peers to nurture sparks of historical curiosity and support novice historians in learning the skills of the discipline? Through a series of case studies this paper offers a critical examination of claims around citizen history.’

The video and slides are linked from the IHR Seminar in Digital History site.