Upcoming talks and travel

Trinity lecture poster
Trinity lecture poster

My edited volume on ‘Crowdsourcing our Cultural Heritage’ for Ashgate, featuring chapters from some of the most amazing people working in the field was published in October 2014 and is now out in paperback. You can read my introduction on the OU repository: Crowdsourcing Our Cultural Heritage: Introduction.

By day, I’m usually at work at the British Library, so drop me a line if you’d like to meet for coffee and a chat. My availability for events is limited, but you can drop me a line if you’d like to book me for an event.

Some upcoming trips: I’m presenting on ‘Crowdsourcing at the British Library: lessons learnt and future directions‘ at the Digital Humanities Congress | University of Sheffield, 6th – 8th September 2018. I’ll be Bonn in November to keynote the 2018 SWIB (Semantic Web in Libraries) conference. I’m also speaking at the BL Labs 2018 Symposium.

In June 2019 I’ll be at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to teach on the HILT digital humanities summer school.

Some recent papers

Some publications are listed or accessible at my ORCID page, my Open University repository page, Humanities Commons page and my Zotero page.

This page is rarely up-to-date or complete, but…

In 2018 I spoke at EuropeanaTech 2018; keynoted at the Academic Art Museum and Library Summit, June 13-15, Oberlin; wrote an article on ‘Breathing life into digital collections at the British Library’ (for ACCESS, the Australian School Library Association’s professional e-journal). 2017-18 was a bit of an odd year and I’ve subsequently reduced the number of invitations I accept each year.

In February 2017 I did a workshop in Edinburgh for Dr Anouk Lang’s Beyond the Black Box: Building Algorithmic and Statistical Literacy through Digital Humanities Tools and Resources and in Santa Barbara for Always Already Computational: Library Collections as Data. I keynoted at DIGIKULT 2017 in Sweden in March, and in June I was in Sydney for the Future Library Congress at EduTECH. I was in Taiwan in August and in October I spoke at the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC and gave a keynote in Angers, France.

In November 2016 I was in Riga, Latvia to give the closing keynote at the Europeana Network Association AGM 2016. In October I spoke at ‘What should be in your digital toolbox‘, gave a keynote, ‘Digital history: evolution or transformation?’ at The Science of Evolution and the Evolution of the Sciences conference in Leuven, Belgium around October 12th and 13th, 2016 and at Internet Librarian International then chaired the Museums Computer Group’s Museums+Tech conference. In August I was in York for ‘Negotiating Expertise’ and in Helsinki for Museum Theme Days 2016 in September.

In June 2016 I was in Luxembourg for a workshop on Network Visualisation in the Cultural Heritage Sector. My talk notes for Network visualisations and the ‘so what?’ problem are online. I also keynoted at LIBER (Ligue des Bibliothèques Européennes de Recherche – Association of European Research Libraries) in Helsinki. My slides are online but may not make much sense without notes.

In March 2016 I was at Rice University in Houston then Austin (at the iSchool in UT Austin then St Edwards), then I was on a panel on ‘Build the Crowdsourcing Community of Your Dreams’ at SXSWi 2016 with Ben Brumfield, Meghan Ferriter and Siobhan Leachman.

In January 2016 I was back in Oxford for a workshop on ‘DIY Digitisation’ at the Bodleian Libraries.

Here’s a summary of talks, fellowships, writing, etc in 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011. You can also follow me on twitter (@mia_out) for updates.

Previous papers are generally listed at miaridge.com or on my blog, Open Objects.

2019: an overview

Projects: Living with Machines

  • Continued recruiting the project team
  • Set up the project website (graphic design by an agency, working with the project team)
  • Helped devise the Communications strategy

Publications

Ridge, M. (forthcoming). Crowdsourcing in cultural heritage: A practical guide to designing and running successful projects. In K. Schuster & S. Dunn (Eds.), Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Digital Humanities. Routledge.

Talks and teaching

An invited talk on ‘Voyages of discovery with digital collections’ for the Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University, Bloomington, June 2019

Blog posts

Other

Peer reviewer, Digital Humanities 2019

2018: an overview

Projects

2018 finished with a bang, as the press release for the British Library/Alan Turing Institute’s Living with Machines project went live. In this project, we’re experimenting with ‘radical collaborations’ around applying data science methods to historical newspaper collections to advance the potential of digital history.

Talks and teaching

January: a lecture on ‘Scholarly crowdsourcing: from public engagement to creating knowledge socially’ for the Introduction to Digital Humanities Masters course at King’s College London, and an ‘Overview of Information Visualisation’ for the CHASE Winter School: Introduction to Digital Humanities.

February: a full-day workshop on Information Visualisation for PhD students in the Digital Humanities for CHASE.

March: a talk on ‘Crowdsourcing: the British Library experience’ for CILIP’s Multimedia Information & Technology (MmIT) Group’s event on ‘The wisdom of the crowd? Crowdsourcing for information professionals’.

April: a talk on ‘Challenges and opportunities in digital scholarship’ for a British Library Research Collaboration Open House, and took part in a panel for the Association of Art Historians (AAH) conference on ‘Sharing knowledge through online engagement’ around Art UK’s Art Detective project at the Courtauld Institute of Art.

May: I was in Rotterdam for a EuropeanaTech panel on User Generated & Institutional Data Transcription projects and gave a talk on ‘Open cultural data in the GLAM sector’ for a CPD25 workshop on The GLAM sector: what can we learn from Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums

June: with Thomas Padilla I co-taught ‘Collections as data‘ for the HILT Digital Humanities Summer School, June 4–8, 2018, University of Pennsylvania. I then went onto Oberlin College to give a keynote on ‘Digital collections as departure points’ at the Academic Art Museums and Libraries Summit.

September: a talk on ‘Crowdsourcing at the British Library: lessons learnt and future directions’ for the Digital Humanities Congress, Sheffield. And a ‘provocation’ for the Building Library Labs event, ‘A modest proposal: crowdsourcing is good for all of us’.

November: I travelled to Bonn to do a keynote on ‘Libraries and their Communities: Participation from Town Halls to Mobile Phones’ for the Semantic Web in Libraries (SWIB) conference, and gave a preview talk on Living with Machines for the British Library Labs Symposium.

Publications

An article on Breathing life into digital collections at the British Library for ACCESS / Journal of the Australian School Library Association, 2018.

A chapter for a Routledge publication on research methods in the Digital Humanities, called ‘Crowdsourcing in cultural heritage: a practical guide to designing and running successful projects’ (currently doing final edits)

Other

I was a peer reviewer for conference proposals and articles for museum studies and digital humanities events and journals.

I also gave internal talks on IIIF and the Universal Viewer and taught Data Visualisation and Crowdsourcing workshops on the British Library’s Digital Scholarship Training Programme.

I wrote a number of blog posts, newsletters and press releases for work. I’ve collected some of those blog posts and newsletter updates for the British Library at Updates from Digital Scholarship at the British Library.

Blog post ‘Notes from ‘AI, Society & the Media: How can we Flourish in the Age of AI’’ and ‘Cross-post: Seeking researchers to work on an ambitious data science and digital humanities project

Conference presentation: How should Cultural Institutions Open and Connect Data?

I was invited to Taichung, Taiwan to present at Link and Linkage: 2017 International Digital Culture Forum on ‘Connected heritage: How should Cultural Institutions Open and Connect Data?’.

From my opening note: ‘I will approach the question by describing the mechanisms organisations have used to open and connect data, then I will look at some of the positive outcomes that resulted from their actions. This is not a technical talk about different acronyms, it’s about connecting people to our shared heritage.’

As I had to prepare speaker notes for the translators, I’m able to share my notes with you: Connected heritage: How should Cultural Institutions Open and Connect Data?

Taichung City Government CIO, Ching-Teng Hsiao’s closing remarks

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Conference presentation: Crowdsourcing in libraries and museums: Challenges, opportunities and digital impacts

I was invited to do a presentation for a conference organised by the Chinese Association of Museums in Taipei, Taiwan. I gave a version of ‘Crowdsourcing in libraries and museums: Challenges, opportunities and digital impacts’ tailored for their audience.

Abstract:

Crowdsourcing in museums and libraries involves asking the public to help with tasks that contribute to a shared, significant goal or research interest related to cultural heritage collections or knowledge. This talk will introduce some key examples of successful crowdsourcing projects that have transcribed, categorised, linked and researched millions of cultural heritage and scientific records, and discuss some of the reasons for their success. Digital technologies have enabled exciting new forms of public participation in cultural heritage and the sciences, but they can also challenge museums, libraries and archives to manage the changes that these new opportunities bring. Audience expectations have changed as social media and digital technologies have encouraged greater organisational transparency, and more flexible digitisation and information management practices. How can museums and libraries work with the public to make collections more accessible while making room for people to explore and enjoy collections in new ways?

Conference presentation: Cross-sector collaboration on digital museum and library projects

I was invited to do a presentation for a ‘VIP workshop’ for the Chinese Association of Museums in Taipei, Taiwan. They asked me to talk about ‘Cross-sector collaboration on digital museum and library projects’.

In my talk, I discussed collaboration through:

  • MCG, MCN: informal support through practitioner groups
  • Culture24’s Let’s Get Real: action research
  • Finland100, BnF: selective digitisation
  • Sharing audience data: MHM, Audience Agency segments
  • UK Libraries taskforce
  • Sector-wide approach: DCMS #CultureIsDigital
  • Europeana – international collaboration on shared infrastructure

As I had to make extensive notes on my slides for the translator, I’m able to share my slides with notes: http://www.miaridge.com/wp-content/uploads/CAM-afternoon-Taiwan-2017-Collaboration-M-Ridge.pdf

The talk lead to some wide-ranging discussion and gave me the opportunity to hear from several directors of Taiwanese national museums and libraries.

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